Design Your Saturday Press 53 Gathering of Poets Experience

Confirmation: Pay securely online with your credit card (or call with your workshop selections and mail your check to Press 53, 560 N. Trade St, Ste 103, Winston-Salem, NC 27101. Call 336-770-5353 to secure workshops and payment by phone. We will email you a confirmation will all of your selections once registration is complete.

Breakfast and Lunch: This year, continental breakfast and lunch will not be not provided. There will be a two-hour break from noon until 2 p.m. so participants can enjoy one of Winston-Salem's many downtown restaurants. We will provide a map listing several restaurants within walking distance from the hotel. Participants can also choose to dine in the Marriott at Graze, one of five North Carolina restaurants recognized for featuring locally grown, raised, caught and made products. 

Vendor Tables: Visit the editors, publishers, and poets from Bull City Press, C&R Press, Main Street Rag Publishing Company, North Carolina Poetry Society, North Carolina Writers' Network, PANK magazine, Press 53, Prime Number Magazine, Snapdragon: A Journal of Art & Healing, Winston-Salem Writers, and Unicorn Press.

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Poetry in Plain Sight Lounge: Free and open to the public, the Poetry Lounge (sponsored by Poetry in Plain Sight: a Winston-Salem Writers-North Carolina Poetry Society project) will feature readings by faculty and guest poets, with presentations, discussions, and readings from our vendors throughout the day. Come one, come all!

Sunday Seminar with Tom Lombardo, from 10 a.m. until noon, at the Marriott. (scroll to bottom to register).

Sunday afternoon poetry reading (Free), March 25, 2 PM, Winston-Salem Forsyth County Public Library, 660 W. 5th Street, book launch reading of Beasts of Eden by Michael Beadle; Irish poet Adrian Rice reading from The Clock Flower and Hickory Station; world traveler Ann Herlong-Bodman reading from Loose in Far-away Places.

Report issues or direct questions to us here.

Register Here

Workshops for Saturday, March 24, 2018

Choose to attend 1, 2, 3, or 4 workshops

To register by phone, call 336-770-5353 with your workshop selections. Mail a check or pay with credit card during your call

Just Added!

New spots for One-on-One critique with Tom Lombardo. Scroll down to secure your spot!

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Glenis Redmond: Reverse the Curse — 10:30-11:45 a.m. and 2-3:15 p.m.
20.00
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Reverse the Curse with Glenis Redmond: This workshop uses a Lucille Clifton poem to reframe negatives into  positives. Yet, this Poetic Blessing is not the easy way out. It encourages participants to face the shadow-side in their lives and through this particular lens offer it to the light. 
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John Gosslee: Feeling Your Way to Meaning in a Poem — 9-10:15 a.m. and 2-3:15 p.m.
20.00
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Feeling Your Way to Meaning in a Poem with John Gosslee: We’re going in-depth on what makes a strong line anyone can identify and take meaning from. We’ll discuss where to break a line and the minutia of how a sentence feels before it means. We’ll also talk about reinventing how the main subject of a poem is expressed, while extending the poem-reader conversation after the poem is read.
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Katie Chaple: The Art of the Tonal Shift — 10:30-11:45 a.m. and 3:30-4:45 p.m.
20.00
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The Art of the Tonal Shift with Katie Chaple: What can shifting the tone in a poem accomplish? It can invigorate, revitalize a poem, and it can certainly change the direction of a poem. The technique of the tonal shift can be a way of breathing life into a poem and of grasping the reader or heightening the reader’s attention. The shift can be subtle or overt; it can be an up- or down-shift. Often, the shift activates surprise in the reader—the good kind. In this workshop, we’ll examine multiple poems that make excellent use of this technique and participants will have opportunities to test out this element of craft by producing new drafts as well as implementing the tonal shift in poems that are still under construction. Participants are invited to bring a few poems that they are working on and/or struggling with.
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Travis Wayne Denton: Un-prosing Your Poetry — 9-10:15 a.m. and 3:30-4:45 p.m.
20.00
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Un-prosing Your Poetry with Travis Denton: We've all been in workshop and received the comment that our darling poem sounds prosy—such a dreaded word for a poet.  We’ll take a close look at what makes poems sing and what makes them simply “talk and drone on.” From narrowing the scope of our subject matter and defining the essentials of the poetic moment, we’ll cover the elements which all good poems must include, with a not-so-basic nuts and bolts approach to what makes a poem. The workshop participants will have the opportunity to write new work, and are also encouraged to bring a poem in progress.

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Ginger Murchison: Grammar: The Way to Intensity in Poems — 9-10:15 a.m. and 2-3:15 p.m.
20.00
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Grammar: The Way to Intensity in Poems with Ginger Murchison: Explore with me the ways grammar works to do much of the heavy lifting to build intensity, sharpen images, write crisper and fresher lines, and add energy to our poems, supporting what poets have known all along: that a poem is indeed a made thing.
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Jacinta V. White: Life of the Elegy — 9-10:15 a.m. and 3:30-4:45 p.m.
20.00
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Life of the Elegy with Jacinta V. White: In this workshop we will look at the craft of the elegy. How do we take pain and memory and turn it into poetry? Whether lamenting someone or the state of the world, we will look at the place of elegies in today's time by examining contemporary poets' work. There will also be time for writing. 
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Joseph Bathanti: Writing the Artefactual Poem — 10:30-11:45 a.m. and 2-3:15 p.m.
20.00
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Writing the Artefactual Poem with Joseph Bathanti: This is essentially a class in Ekphrasis (in this case ekphrastic poetry), “a vivid description of a scene or, more commonly, a work of art”—as defined by The Poetry Foundation. But, for the purposes of this class, I’d like to broaden the definition of what we’ll engage in, in order to accommodate other texts apart from what we think of as typical works of art. In Literary Theory, a text is any object that can be read, whether this object is a work of literature, photograph (typically written about in ekphrastic poems), clothing, a matchbook, postcard, film, even a baseball glove, or wristwatch, you name it—since all these texts embody stories, conjure language specific to them, and are often tied to memory and/or place. To demystify the above: you’ll essentially be writing about an artefact(s)/object(s) to which you have deep personal connections, not only describing/representing it, but also charting your autobiographical associations with it—the multi-layered story it triggers and embodies how you’re influenced and informed, even obsessed, by it. I’ll bring to class examples of representative poems for us to examine and discuss and I’d like you to, please, bring artefacts/texts you’d like to write about during the sessions. Participants will come away with a draft of a poem or two, maybe three.
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Searching The Hiding Places: Mining Memory with Adrian Rice: In The Prelude, William Wordsworth alludes to “the hiding places” of his “power,” which in his youth had “stood open,” then gradually narrowed to “glimpses,” and, with age, threatened to cloud over altogether.  While still able, he wished to “give a substance and a life” to what he felt.  In Feelings Into Words, Seamus Heaney claims Wordsworth is talking here of “poetry as divination”; of  “poetry as revelation of the self to the self”; and— so aptly Heaneyesque—of “poetry as a dig.”  Join me on this workshop adventure to search the hiding places of poetic power for the likes of Wordsworth and Heaney, and then to mine our own memories to unearth some hidden gems.

Twenty-five minute One-on-One Critique Sessions

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Tom Lombardo: One-on-One Critique Session (NEW SPOTS ADDED!)
30.00
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Sunday Seminar with Tom Lombardo

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